Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

After The Flash: Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London, showcases photo documents from the age of The Bomb. All photographs are taken from the wide archive of art historian and curator John O’Brian.
Both the exhibition and the book are divided into sections, that explore different aspects of the culture that surrounded and was fueled by the atomic bomb. From its testings to the fear that came with the menace of war, and pushed people to build shelters. But also the horror of radioactivity scarred faces in comparison to the popularization of the bomb culture.
The role of propaganda is obviously strong, especially in linking the use of atomic power to a necessity of security from the Enemy. In the show, this was captured by the camera in its visible signs — the celebration that was made of The Bomb in popular culture by showmen and women, and by institutions (that, for instance, named streets after it), and so on. One more section is dedicated to the background of this atomic frenzy, i.e. the technical and industrial worlds connected with its construction. On the other side, some of the images show the counter movement that opposed war and the use of atomic weapons.
A greater part of John O’Brian’s collection is gathered in his book Camera Atomica, published by Black Dog Publishing, neighbor and partner of WORK gallery.

After The Flash: Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London through December 20, 2014

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Atomic Postcard – Britain, n.d. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Atomic Postcard – Explosion at Yucca Flat, n.d. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Photographer Unknown, Face, 1945-1950. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Photographer Unknown, Operation Redwing Super H Bomb: Tom and the Big Boy and Baby Bomb, 1956. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Curt Gunther, Hydrogen Bomb Explosion, Yucca Flats, Nevada, 12 October 1967. Courtesy the photographer. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

University of California, Interior of Heavy Ion Linear Accelerator, UC Berkeley, 1971. Courtesy University of California. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Photographer Unknown, Cave Bomb Shelter, June 1972. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Michael Crawford, Atomic Lanes, n.d. Courtesy the photographer. Collection of John O’Brian

After the Flash. Photography from the Atomic Archive at WORK, London

Photographer Unknown, Anti-Nuclear Bomb War Protest Sign, July 1967. Collection of John O’Brian

Discussion 2 commenti

  1. November 9, 2014 at 8:06 pm

    I also have a collection that I own. Size of the Post card photos are 15″ x 12″.
    They are exceptional photo’s showing many different elements of the British naval, and airforce, and space training, in the 1940′s and 1950′s.
    I was wondering if you would be interested in them.
    Thank You

    • November 11, 2014 at 6:11 pm

      Dear Janet,
      That looks very interesting, but we were simply reviewing an art exhibition, we aren’t collectors.
      Thank you,
      Droste Effect

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